Djugerari is 108kms (1.5hrs travel) by road from Fitzroy Crossing.  Djugerari was established as an Aboriginal community in the early 1980s by Walmajarri people moving from Cherrabun Pastoral Station where many of the men had previously worked as stockmen.

The current Djugerari community was set up approximately a kilometre away from the original campsite. People back then lived in canvas tents on the ridges. There is now a public primary school located in Djugarari.

During the wet season Christmas Creek (which feeds into the Fitzroy River) floods making the road impassable for up to a week; vehicles may also become bogged on other sections of the road. A number of smaller watercourses in close proximity to the community are fed by the Shore Ranges, which form a distinctive rocky backdrop to the community.

At the base of the ranges, the areas is gently undulating and contains the pindan soils, which are typical of the Kimberley. Low lying areas outside the community contain reactive black soils. The vegetation in this transitional zone between desert to the south and the wetter monsoon forests of the north Kimberley comprises mainly grasslands and savannah.

http://www.planning.wa.gov.au/dop_pub_pdf/Djugerari_LP1_Amendment_1_Report.pdf

Yanunijarra’s Ngurrara Rangers are based out at Djugerari. Their work includes fire management, feral camel and pig management and maintenance of significant cultural sites. They have established a nursery at Djugerari Community and run educational programs for schools.

Harry Yungabanis a Cultural Coordinator at Nindilingarri Cultural Health Services.

Harry says that it’s important that the community continues to thrive as it offers a place away from the complexity of towns and the lure of drugs and alcohol. Maintaining independence is important to the Djugarari community and as well as supporting the ranger program the community would also like to establish a brick making facility.


Our communities are alive and full of stories about how they came to be and why that place in country is important for health and culture.

If you've got photos or information that you would like to add or change to this page please contact the Communications Officer on 9193 0600 or email at feedback@mww.org.au